https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Resistance training in addition to aerobic activity is associated with lower likelihood of depression and comorbid depression and anxiety symptoms: a cross sectional analysis of Australian women https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:37121 Wed 19 Aug 2020 09:57:44 AEST ]]> A cross-sectional cluster analysis of the combined association of physical activity and sleep with sociodemographic and health characteristics in mid-aged and older adults https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:31075 Wed 01 Apr 2020 12:50:31 AEDT ]]> Use of oral contraceptives to manipulate menstruation in young, physically active women https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:33584 300 min/wk) women (age 23 ± 5 y), and 108 competitive (state-, national- or international-level) female athletes (age 23 ± 4 y) completed a self-administered questionnaire assessing OC-regimen habits and reasons for manipulation of menstruation. Results: The majority (74%) of OC users reported having deliberately manipulated menstruation at least once during the previous year, with 29% reporting having done so at least 4 times. Prevalence of menstrual manipulation (at least once in the previous year) was not different between competitive athletes, subelite recreationally active women, and recreationally active women (77% vs 74% vs 72%; P > .05). The most cited reasons for manipulating menstruation were special events or holidays (rated by 75% as important/very important), convenience (54%), and sport competition (54%). Conclusions: Menstrual manipulation through extended OC regimens is common practice in recreationally and competitively active young women, for a range of reasons relating to convenience that are not limited to physical activity. This strategy may help reduce hormone-related barriers to exercise participation, thereby positively affecting participation and performance.]]> Thu 22 Nov 2018 10:04:22 AEDT ]]> Healthy mind, healthy body: a randomized trial testing the efficacy of a computer-tailored vs. interactive web-based intervention for increasing physical activity and reducing depressive symptoms https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:25391 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:39:07 AEDT ]]> Depressive symptoms associated with psychological correlates of physical activity and perceived helpfulness of intervention features https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:22546 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:14:45 AEDT ]]>