https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Evaluation of fetal kidney growth using ultrasound: a systematic review https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:30441 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:38:10 AEDT ]]> Ultrasound imaging of the renal parenchyma of premature neonates for the assessment of renal growth and glomerulomegaly https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:30481 37 completed wk) admitted to the neonatal unit with minor neonatal conditions were recruited into the control group. Complete data sets were available in 91 premature neonates and during the same period, 56 term neonates were recruited as the control. The median birth weight (preterm babies) was 930 g (780-1220 g), and the mean gestational age was 27.0 wk (2.1 wk). Total renal volume (TRV) increased from 14.6 (4.3) cm 3 to 20.5 (5.3) cm 3 from 32 to 37 wk PMA. During the same period, the total renal parenchyma (TRP) thickness increased from 1.6 (0.3) cm to 1.8 (0.3) cm. At 37 wk PMA, ex-premature neonates have a significantly smaller total renal volume (20.5 [5.3] versus 25.9 [6.4] cm 3 ; p < 0.001) and total renal parenchyma thickness (1.8 [0.3] versus 2.0 [0.2] cm; p = 0.015) compared with term (control) neonates. However, premature neonates at 37 wk PMA have a larger TRP:TRV ratio compared with term neonates (0.09 [0.02] versus 0.0 8 [0.02] cm -2 ; p < 0.001). Reduced nephron endowment as a result of prematurity may cause the remaining nephrons to undergo compensatory glomerulomegaly and we postulate this is the reason for the observed differences. Ultrasound imaging of the renal parenchyma shows promise in assessing the effects of prematurity on the developing kidney.]]> Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:26:41 AEDT ]]>