https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Cancer patient preferences for the provision of information regarding emotional concerns in relation to medical procedures: a discrete choice experiment https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:38187 Wed 11 Aug 2021 15:38:49 AEST ]]> Oncology patient preferences for depression care: A discrete choice experiment https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:36883 Tue 14 Jul 2020 16:06:43 AEST ]]> Support persons' preferences for the type of consultation and the format of information provided when making a cancer treatment decision https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:34896 0.05). Our findings suggest that when making cancer treatment decisions, clinicians should consider offering patients and support persons written and online information, combined with two shorter consultations.]]> Tue 03 Sep 2019 18:19:32 AEST ]]> A discrete choice experiment to assess cancer patients' preferences for when and how to make treatment decisions https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:34902 Tue 03 Sep 2019 17:58:13 AEST ]]> Preferences for life expectancy discussions following diagnosis with a life-threatening illness: a discrete choice experiment https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:38299 p < 0.01). More patients preferred the two 20-min rather than the one 40-min consultation format (55% vs 45%, z = 4.284, p < 0.01). Information content did not influence choice. Age, cancer type, and patient-perceived prognosis were not associated with preferences. Conclusion: Healthcare professionals should assess cancer patients' preferences for engaging in life expectancy discussions as soon as they have this information, and ensure patients have adequate time to consider the information they receive, seek additional information and involve others if they wish.]]> Thu 14 Oct 2021 15:49:21 AEDT ]]>