https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Evaluation of associations between genetically predicted circulating protein biomarkers and breast cancer risk https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:37129 via the integration of genomics and proteomics data. In the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), with 122,977 cases and 105,974 controls of European descendants, we evaluated the associations of the genetically predicted concentrations of >1,400 circulating proteins with breast cancer risk. We used data from a large-scale protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL) analysis as our study instrument. Summary statistics for these pQTL variants related to breast cancer risk were obtained from the BCAC and used to estimate odds ratios (OR) for each protein using the inverse-variance weighted method. We identified 56 proteins significantly associated with breast cancer risk by instrumental analysis (false discovery rate <0.05). Of these, the concentrations of 32 were influenced by variants close to a breast cancer susceptibility locus (ABO, 9q34.2). Many of these proteins, such as insulin receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1 and other membrane receptors (OR: 0.82-1.18, p values: 6.96 × 10-43.28 × 10-8), are linked to insulin resistance and estrogen receptor signaling pathways. Proteins identified at other loci include those involved in biological processes such as alcohol and lipid metabolism, proteolysis, apoptosis, immune regulation and cell motility and proliferation. Consistent associations were observed for 22 proteins in the UK Biobank data (p < 0.05). The study identifies potential novel biomarkers for breast cancer, but further investigation is needed to replicate our findings.]]> Wed 19 Aug 2020 12:59:44 AEST ]]> Fine-mapping of the HNF1B multicancer locus identifies candidate variants that mediate endometrial cancer risk. https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:20561 Wed 11 Apr 2018 15:36:46 AEST ]]> Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies common susceptibility polymorphisms for colorectal and endometrial cancer near SH2B3 and TSHZ1 https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:26195 Wed 11 Apr 2018 15:00:42 AEST ]]> Refined histopathological predictors of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status: a large-scale analysis of breast cancer characteristics from the BCAC, CIMBA, and ENIGMA consortia https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:19379 Wed 11 Apr 2018 14:19:24 AEST ]]> The burden of cancer attributable to modifiable risk factors: the Australian cancer-PAF cohort consortium https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:30583 Wed 11 Apr 2018 14:15:39 AEST ]]> Candidate locus analysis of the TERT-CLPTM1L cancer risk region on chromosome 5p15 identifies multiple independent variants associated with endometrial cancer risk https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:28088 −6 to P = 7.7 × 10−5). Only one falls into a haplotype previously associated with other cancer types (rs7705526, in TERT intron 1), and this SNP has been shown to alter TERT promoter activity. One of the novel associations (rs13174814) maps to a second region in the TERT promoter and the other (rs62329728) is in the promoter region of CLPTM1L; neither are correlated with previously reported cancer-associated SNPs. Using TCGA RNASeq data, we found significantly increased expression of both TERT and CLPTM1L in endometrial cancer tissue compared with normal tissue (TERTP = 1.5 × 10−18, CLPTM1LP = 1.5 × 10−19). Our study thus reports a novel endometrial cancer risk locus and expands the spectrum of cancer types associated with genetic variation at 5p15, further highlighting the importance of this region for cancer susceptibility.]]> Wed 11 Apr 2018 09:49:25 AEST ]]> The future burden of kidney and bladder cancers preventable by behavior modification in Australia: a pooled cohort study https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:36667 2 standard alcoholic drinks/day (41.2%). In conclusion, large fractions of kidney and bladder cancers in Australia are preventable by behavior change.]]> Tue 23 Jun 2020 12:36:42 AEST ]]> Estimating the impact of mandatory fortification of bread with iodine on pregnant and post-partum women https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:17515 Sat 24 Mar 2018 08:03:51 AEDT ]]> Genetic variation in mitotic regulatory pathway genes is associated with breast tumor grade https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:20582 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:55:36 AEDT ]]> Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:26799 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:36:26 AEDT ]]> Genetic risk score mendelian randomization shows that obesity measured as body mass index, but not waist:hip ratio, is causal for endometrial cancer https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:30306 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:31:48 AEDT ]]> Genes associated with histopathologic features of triple negative breast tumors predict molecular subtypes https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:24832 Sat 24 Mar 2018 07:15:11 AEDT ]]> The future colorectal cancer burden attributable to modifiable behaviors: a pooled cohort study https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:35110 Pdifference < .001). The burden attributed to these factors was also higher for those born in Australia (28.7%) than elsewhere (16.8%, Pdifference = .047). We observed modification of the smoking-attributable burden by alcohol consumption and educational attainment, and modification of the obesity-attributable burden by age group and birthplace. Conclusions: We produced up-to-date estimates of the future CRC burden attributed to modifiable behaviors. We revealed novel differences between men and women, and other high–CRC burden subgroups that could potentially benefit most from programs that support behavioral change and early detection.]]> Fri 21 Jun 2019 10:25:59 AEST ]]> The preventable burden of breast cancers for premenopausal and postmenopausal women in Australia: A pooled cohort study https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:37400 n = 214,536) to national cancer and death registries, and estimated the strength of the associations between behaviours causally related to cancer incidence and death using adjusted proportional hazards models. We estimated exposure prevalence from representative health surveys. We combined these estimates to calculate Population Attributable Fractions (PAFs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and compared PAFs for population subgroups. During the first 10 years follow‐up, there were 640 incident breast cancers for premenopausal women, 2,632 for postmenopausal women, and 8,761 deaths from any cause. Of future breast cancers for premenopausal women, any regular alcohol consumption explains 12.6% (CI = 4.3–20.2%), current use of oral contraceptives for ≥5 years 7.1% (CI = 0.3–13.5%), and these factors combined 18.8% (CI = 9.1–27.4%). Of future breast cancers for postmenopausal women, overweight or obesity (BMI ≥25 kg/m2) explains 12.8% (CI = 7.8–17.5%), current use of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) 6.9% (CI = 4.8–8.9%), any regular alcohol consumption 6.6% (CI = 1.5–11.4%), and these factors combined 24.2% (CI = 17.6–30.3%). The MHT‐related postmenopausal breast cancer burden varied by body fatness, alcohol consumption and socio‐economic status, the body fatness‐related postmenopausal breast cancer burden by alcohol consumption and educational attainment, and the alcohol‐related postmenopausal breast cancer burden by breast feeding history. Our results provide evidence to support targeted and population‐level cancer control activities.]]> Fri 06 Nov 2020 17:34:03 AEDT ]]> The preventable burden of endometrial and ovarian cancers in Australia: a pooled cohort study https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:35870 Fri 06 Nov 2020 17:29:46 AEDT ]]>