https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Index ${session.getAttribute("locale")} 5 Long-term mortality risks associated with mild anaemia in older persons: the Busselton health study https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:22222 10 g/dl) and normocytic. There was an increased risk of death from all causes and from cancer for men with low haemoglobin. Cancers were predominantly of the prostate and genito-urinary organs, and to a lesser extent the gastrointestinal tract. There was no increased risk of all cause or cancer death in women. Conclusion: mild, normocytic anaemia is associated with survival reductions in middle-aged and older men, where it often occurs with prostate, gastrointestinal and other cancers, and should be investigated to exclude treatable causes.]]> Wed 11 Apr 2018 12:10:33 AEST ]]> Noncitrus fruits as novel dietary environmental modifiers of iron stores in people with or without HFE gene mutations https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:4605 .05). Conclusion: Noncitrus fruits are environmental modifiers of iron status independent of HFE genotype. This could have important implications for the provision of evidence-based dietary advice to patients with other iron-storage disorders.]]> Wed 11 Apr 2018 09:47:07 AEST ]]> A cross-sectional community study of serum iron measures and cognitive status in older adults https://ogma.newcastle.edu.au/vital/access/ /manager/Repository/uon:10312 0.05). In participants without dementia (n=749), neither serum ferritin in 1994/5 or 2003/4 nor change in serum ferritin between these times was related to total CAMCOG or executive function scores, with or without adjustment for gender, age, National Adult reading test, or stroke history (all p> 0.05). No relationships were observed between ferritin and cognition for participants with possible or probable dementia (n=51). All participants identified as HFE C282Y homozygous or with serum ferritin >1,000 ng/ml had normal CAMCOG scores. We conclude abnormal body iron stores (low or high) are unlikely to have clinically significant effects on cognition or dementia risk in community-dwelling older people.]]> Sat 24 Mar 2018 08:12:22 AEDT ]]>